Part 2- Creating a Gospel Life Plan: GOAL Setting

Over the next few weeks Joy and I will be sharing something near and dear to our heart. "How to Create a Gospel Life Plan." We are both in agreement the last six years of our marriage and life have been the most intentional and fruitful of our fourteen years of marriage. The main reason for this, is our commitment to create and evaluate a yearly gospel life plan. In the upcoming posts we will share different aspects of exactly how this is done and hopefully encourage you and your family to practice the same. Feel free to email me with any questions you may have at gross@namb.net and everyone is invited to our Gospel Life Plan Workshop on Nov 21st in New Orleans, this will be a great jump start to your year, we hope to see you!

S.M.A.R.T GOALS

If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else.
— Yogi Berra

Scott Thomas once said, "living life without goals is like playing football with no end zone." Needless to say, playing football without an end zone would be meaningless, which is also true when we live life with no goals. Cultivating a discipline of setting gospel-centered goals radically changed my life and the life of my family. Our lives went from being all over the map to missionally focused, resulting in gospel fruitfulness. 

The following are ground rules we use as a family for goal setting in our gospel life plan. We pray they are helpful as you as you seek to love God, lead well, and live the gospel for glory of God. 

S – (Specific/Strategic)


Prayer is the starting point for setting clear and strategic goals. Goals are then set and steps of action are developed in order to achieve the goal. We set specific goals when we ask why, who, what, when, where, and how? Prioritizing your life helps inform you concerning strategic initiatives in goal setting. 

M- (Measurable)


What good is a goal that you can't measure? If your goals are not measurable, you never know whether you are making progress toward successful completion. You will not know if you are growing if you cannot measure. Written goals are a means to evaluate and measure growth. 

A- (Attainable) 


Goals must be realistic and attainable. The best goals require a person to stretch a bit to achieve them, but they are not so difficult that they are unattainable. Goals should create a meaningful challenge for the individual. Making un-realistic goals will lead to discouragement and defeat. However, sanctification will involve times of crucifying our flesh in order to grow. 

R- (Relevant)


The foundation for Christian goal setting is; are they relevant to the gospel of Jesus Christ? Make sure you don't confuse goal setting with performance. Your goals are not to define your value and worth, your identity is in Christ. There is no way we can set a "goal" for God to love us any more than He already does. We do not perform our way into pleasing God. Personal and family goals are a way to grow in Christ and manifest His kingdom here on earth, as you LOVE God, LEAD well, and LIVE the gospel. 

T- (Time Bound)


Goals should have starting points, ending points, and fixed durations. Commitment to deadlines helps individuals to focus their efforts on completion. Goals without deadlines or schedules for completion tend to be overtaken by the day-to-day responsibilities and difficulties in life. 

“So I do not run aimlessly; I do not box as one beating the air.” (1 Corinthians 9:26, ESV)