Part 1- Creating A Gospel Life Plan: Planning 101

 

Over the next few weeks Joy and I will be sharing something near and dear to our heart. "How to Create a Gospel Life Plan." We are both in agreement the last six years of our marriage and life have been the most intentional and fruitful of our fourteen years of marriage. The main reason for this, is our commitment to create and evaluate a yearly gospel life plan. In the upcoming posts we will share different aspects of exactly how this is done and hopefully encourage you and your family to practice the same. Feel free to email me with any questions you may have at gross@namb.net and everyone is invited to our Gospel Life Plan Workshop on Nov 21st in New Orleans, this will be a great jump start to your year, we hope to see you!

Planning 101


Cultivating a healthy habit of planning is essential in creating a gospel life plan. Joy and I consistently implement times of planning, calendaring, and evaluation. Here are some of our notes when considering how to effectively plan. 

For which of you, desiring to build a tower, does not first sit down and count the cost, whether he has enough to complete it? Otherwise, when he has laid a foundation and is not able to finish, all who see it begin to mock him, saying, ‘This man began to build and was not able to finish.
— Luke 14:28–30

Ground Rules:


1. Rhythms over rigidness.


Life does not stand still, even if you do. Things are always changing with family, work, and schedules. One critical key to planning is to realize what rhythms of life you are in. You will plan differently with two infants than you will with two teenagers. Creating a plan so rigid that it is impossible to implement will only lead to defeat. Learn to roll with the seasons of life you find yourself in and plan accordingly.

2. Consistency over compulsory.


Planning with a list of mandatory accomplishments each week will soon become drudgery, which inevitable results in failure. Planning should always aim for unchanging achievement over a period of time (consistency) in contrast to metrics which you are obligated to perform (compulsory). Joy and I keep the word consistent in front of our children, this is what we pray they see modeled in us and embrace as their own. 

3. Grace over law.  


We cannot plan our way into pleasing God. Gospel-centered planning keeps the finished work of Christ in view for all that we plan to do and that we planned and failed to do. Our worth and value are in Christ, not our plans, therefore we are free to plan and live by that plan with and in grace. 

For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God,
— Ephesians 2:8

4. Long -term lifestyle over short-term fix.


Our current culture is fixated on the short-term fix. We want to lose 50 lb. in 10 days and are mad when we do not get our desired results. Cultivating a healthy habit of planning is a powerful tool in bringing about long-term lifestyle change personally and spiritually. Don't believe the lie, there are no quick fixes in this life. 

Why Plan?


1. Direction determines destination.
2. Drifting is a result of poor planning.
3. Discipline is a means of sanctification.

Have nothing to do with irreverent, silly myths. Rather train (discipline) yourself for godliness;
— 1 Timothy 4:7

4. Discipleship happens when we plan for it.
There are 168 hours in a week. If you sleep 8 hours a day that leaves you 112. What are your priorities? You will either AGONIZE or PRIORITIZE! 

  • Everything cannot be a priority. You can’t have it all.
  • Everything should not be a priority. All things are not created equal.
  • Some activities and investments are more important than others.
  • Some activities and investments are more lasting than others. 

You will either master time or time will master you.

5. Planning is an act of obedience.
6. Planning is an act of stewardship.
7. Planning manifests the kingdom.

How to begin planning:


1. Identify your priorities.
2. Address your conflict. (laziness, idleness, over commitment, what keeps you from planning and living by a plan?)
3. Develop a process.
4. Implement and evaluate the process.

Do not get stuck!


1. Some people are stuck because they fail to get perspective. They are afraid to acknowledge their current condition.
2. Some people are stuck because they don’t put their plan into action. They are unwilling to do the hard work of being disciplined and monitoring their progress.
3. Some people are stuck because they fail to plan. They assume if they hope and pray for a better future, they can cling to past practices and still find success.

When it comes to life, most people are spectators. They watch events unfold a day at a time. They may plan their careers, the building of a new home, or even a vacation, but it never occurs to them to plan their life. As a result, they drift along, often to destinations they would have never consciously chosen: failing health, a broken marriage, or a stalled career. But it doesn’t have to be this way.
— Michael Hyatt