Kingdom Families And Goal Setting (Part 1)

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Isaac and I were privileged watch a young man from our home town in MS play last week in the Dallas vs. New Orleans game. It was incredible to see the dreams and goals of a teenager I saw play high school football, achieved in a Dallas Cowboys uniform. And if you have never been in the Superdome, it is a surreal experience. Some of the greatest sporting events and athletes, were a part of what I grew up calling the "Sugar Bowl." The Stadium and our young NFL friend are a reminder of what it means to set goals and reach those goals.  

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Sadly, when our playing days are over and youth has passed us by, we stop reaching and striving in life. We get more settled and complacent, and become the very person, that lives vicariously through someone or in something else. It is easier to live off the goals and desires of others than give the sacrifice and discipline required to meet those goals. After years of apathy and the idea that we have very little to accomplish, setting goals in life are forgotten.

In our current culture of Gospel-Centeredness (which you will see I am all for below) achievement and goals are almost frowned upon. Some have co-opted a do-nothing, lazy, and passionless phrase "resting" or "trusting" in the Gospel for an active, courageous, and passionate biblical Gospel-Centeredness. Jonathan Edwards was known for his 70 resolutions, but his own words remind us that they were not by his strength or for his glory...

“Being sensible that I am unable to do any thing without God’s help, I do humbly entreat him, by his grace, to enable me to keep these Resolutions, so far as they are agreeable to his will, for Christ’s sake." -Jonathan Edwards

During the first week of December my family and I will take our annual goal setting and planning retreat. This year we are taking three days to reflect, repent, and refocus. Joy and I will reflect on our goals and plans from 2013 and set goals individually and as a family for 2014. This will be the fourth year we have made a commitment to set goals as a family, and to say it has changed our marriage and life would be an understatement. 

First, I want to encourage you to read a book that really transformed my thoughts about what it meant to love God, lead my family, and live the Gospel. The premise in this book has become the foundation and filter for so much of my life. It would be well worth your time to pick up a copy and read Gospel Coach by Scott Thomas and Tom Wood. 

Second, spend some time reflecting on how you are evaluating growth for yourself and your family. How do you measure what you can't manage? Is there a tangible way to see the fruit of the Gospel in your life and leadership? Paul talked about how the Gospel was productive, proficient, and powerful in the life of believers, Of this you have heard before in the word of the truth, the gospel, which has come to you, as indeed in the whole world it is bearing fruit and increasing—as it also does among you, since the day you heard it and understood the grace of God in truth,” -(Colossians 1:5–6, ESV)  If you are in Christ, you should be bearing and increasing in the fruit of the Gospel. In Part 2 of this series I will share practical ways to set goals and offers some tools to manage those goals. 

Living life with no goals, is like playing football with no end zone.
— Scott Thomas

Finally, make sure you don't confuse goal setting with performance. Goal setting should be Gospel-Centered. Your goals are not to define your value and worth, your identity is in Christ. If you are in Christ you are already approved, forgiven, and accepted. There is no way we can set a "goal" for God to love us any more than He already does. We do not perform our way into pleasing God. Personal and family goals are a way to grow in Christ and manifest His kingdom here on earth, in your life and the life of your family. Through Gospel-Centered goals we aim to display the rule and reign of Christ in and through our lives. 

The gospel-centered life is a life where a Christian experiences a growing personal reliance on the gospel that protects him from depending on his own religious performance and being seduced and overwhelmed by idols....Gospel-Centered People-They are driven by a love for Jesus and his work on our behalf. Gospel-centered people are focused on Jesus His Finished work, His Present Work, and His Future Work.
— Joe Thorn